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> NCAA Crawls Some unx Azz
DevilDJ
post Nov 13 2014, 09:13 PM
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QUOTE
Of all the gin joints / colleges in all the towns in

QUOTE
The Great Unpleasantness has become unpleasantier. It wasn’t “all over” with those unpaid parking tickets way way way back when.... or with The Martin Report.... or with Ken’s Report. There are children entering pre-school who were unborn when Marvin hit SEND. Those children are now old enough to ask: “Mom, what kind of name is Tydreke?”

AND NOW.... To paraphrase Bogey’s Rick Blaine: “Of all the gin joints (colleges) in all the towns in the world.....

..... a cheating scandal erupts involving a Sports Ethics class - specifically designed for athletes at a charming little elite Ivy League institution in Hanover, New Hampshire. BobLee, you don't mean DARTMOUTH? Yep (LINK) .

This Dartmouth scandal has nothing to do with a certain charming little Chancellor in South Bldg. But who can blame those bloodthirsty ABCers for ROTFLTAO? .... C'mon Man!

QUOTE
HISTORY WAS MADE just minutes ago.... I heard from MaryW at 3:54 PM Today (Thurs).
She just completed a phone interview with Voice Of America - Asia.
FINALLY.... Those 8,000,000,000 Freakin' Chinese Now KNOW about The Great Unpleasantness. How much they CARE is TBD. But they now KNOW.
Absolutely True Story.

QUOTE
Looking on the bright side; maybe this will divert attention from Tydreke Speaks. Or from Matt & Bryn Speak About Tydreke Speaks. Yeah, right.

This Glorious Mess is an All-You-Can-Eat Buffet for every species of bloodthirsty ABC lynch mobber, Madeleines, Hamchunks, board monkeys, Holocaust-deniers, rubberneckers, and Franklin Street Ostrichs. Curious bystanders with no deep-seated partisanship either way (there actually are some of those by the way) are now shaking their heads in amazement. The body count just keeps mounting.

Re: Tydreke Speaks (LINK).... and Matt & Bryn Speak (LINK):

Even without construing Butch’s ill-chosen “then go to Harvard” comment; Tydreke Speaks merits its own chapter in this Monty Python melodrama.

What is involved in getting a degree in Communications from uncCH? Communications is a common major at many institutions and is very popular with FB / BkB student-athletes across the country. Judging from Tydreke Speaks, it is not the same as Public Speaking or Public Relations.

QUOTE
Based on Tydreke Speaks, I have my doubts that the Communications curriculum at uncCH is overly-taxing academically-speaking. I’m sure the Official ABC Research Dept can and will verify that initial perception.

As “interesting” as Tydreke Speaks was, I was equally interested in Matt & Bryn Speak. I’ve never met Matt Merletti, Bryn Renner or Tydreke Powell.

I do recall that Matt’s Dad is in the US Secret Service and Bryn’s Dad is/was a high school football coach in Chapel Hill. That leads me to assume Matt & Bryn came to uncCH MUCH MUCH better equipped to cope with the prevailing socio-academic environment than did Tydreke from little A-hoskie NC.

That Matt & Bryn caught on quickly and did indeed take full advantage of the complete uncCH experience is not surprising. Neither is it surprising that Tydreke apparently did not. As Rashad McCants did not. ..... The Matts and Bryns ain't the problem. But you know their Ode To Butch had the IC goobers turning happy backflips!

Prior to Marvin hitting SEND, a lot of carolina Way Kool-Aid-aholics would have naturally assumed Matt & Bryn were “typical unc student-athletes". Recall my mother always happily assumed Rusty Clark was a “typical unc Basketball player". Both being warm fuzzy, albeit rather erroneous, assumptions.

I’ve been told that “Mary” knew Tydreke Powell on an athlete-tutor basis. Mary probably knew of Matt Merletti and Bryn Renner too. Matt was a co-captain and Bryn, of course, the QB. Everyone knows the QB. Do you think Mary had to use phonics flashcards to help Matt or Bryn “learn to read” college level textbooks?

Matt & Bryn certainly think very highly of Butch Davis. Tydreke does not share their opinion. Matt & Bryn & Tydreke were teammates. They apparently were not soulmates.

Can unc field an ACC-competitive football team composed of 80+ “Matt & Bryns”?

QUOTE
IF unc COULD field an ACC-competitive FB team of all Matt & Bryns (and Dannys), they would. Matt & Bryn are very Low Maintenance. The Tydrekes and Marvins and Rashads and Greg Littles; well, they’re NOT so Low Maintenance. But they are very very good football players. Matts & Bryns don’t even need Mary or whatshisname that hates Mary so much.

uncCH’s faculty, admins and Chancellor Folt (from Dartmouth!) are pondering the future direction of carolina Football and Basketball. One hopes they will consider the futility of Dick Crum’s lament. Dreaming that they can be:

“.... Harvard (or Dartmouth - ouch!) during the week and Oklahoma on Saturday”

If unc’s powers–that-be insist on continuing to play the silly Harvard / Oklahoma charade then The Great Unpleasantness will simply go on.... and on..... and on..... and on. Regardless of how hard the NCAA's hob nail boot eventually stomps on’em.

COMMENTS:
QUOTE
M_N

Lots of good responses.

Sal said: "The Plantation analogy used by others seems to fit pretty well as far as I see it."

I don't see how anyone in the black community can send their child to unc to play sports NOW. It is crystal clear what they though of them as student-athletes, and it's not much different than is was on a cotton plantation circa 1830. Adjectives can't adequately describe how reprehensible it is.

SACS: Did you see Provost Dean's response? Here, I'll quote:" "The entire university should not be punished for the academic fraud that went on for nearly 20 years."

Just....wow.

Bob said: "Such a comprehensive investigative report handed to them is unheard of."

I think its just "comprehensive" in terms of AFAM, and it is quite comprehensive in that regard. But as we know from the emails, several other departments participated. We know Communications, Philosophy, Geology and EXSS among a few others. So whatever the total number of AFAM classes there were that are fake, I do believe based on the emails in the Wainstein supplemental info that the total number of fakery is certainly....well, more than he reported.

LOIC: are we sure they weren't in complete control?
________________


BL:

Whether it is 100% comprehensive or not its a lot more so than "Bruce Pearl's cellphone log" or "a receipt for an unauthorized slice of pizza" or a selfie of Jameis standing on a table yelling F-bombs.


SWuncer

I'm still a Dean fan,until its proven he knew about Crowder's false belief that she knew more than Bill Friday and any of the other good, honest unc oldtimers. However, I've always cringed when I listened to athletes say, "We was." Just how hard is to teach an athlete to conjugate a verb properly? Surely, they could remember, "I was, he was, we WERE."
______________

BL:

I "was / were" never a TruBeliever in Dean being born in a manger et al. Respected his coaching acumen and success for sure but never granted him sainthood and beyond. .... our political difference were a part of that I admit.

I don't believe one HAS to forsake their respect for DES to accept that unc has been grossly negligent in LOIC - Lack of Institutional Control - and THAT is an institutional felony with dire consequences.

Simple Man

Much enjoyed this rendetion BLS. Couple of thoughts - our youngest is a lacrosse player at little Sewanee (Univ. of the South) on a highly ranked team yet has the time to study and take any course path he wishes. He's a Journalism major like your child. We visit each fall for a big week long parent/alum/just for fun event each fall. We merrily watch the Sewannee football team lose that game each year; although, no one is upset. In fact, we have just as much fun win or lose - ESPN tells me that's horrible.

Remembering the first half of my life in my beloved Old North State (from my NE home) I can't help but think the great unpleasantness will continue for a very long time and here's why - in my experience, probably 90% of unc alum are burdened with the entitlement trait which plays heavily into their facade.

Even after being clearly caught with the largest, unique, cheating scandal in NCAA history; it follows that their view of the overwhelming evidence as simply wrong. Why? (decades of cheating will have this affect) Because they are entitled to greatness. The others see it as an opportunity for unc to lead the NCAA into reform because if unc does it, surely everyone does.
_____________


BL:

Yes. I joke about so many being permanently drunk on carolina Way Wine. I don't know a better way to describe that sense of invincible entitlement all woven out of the Messianic cult worship of Dean Smith.

Many will NEVER accept that any of this was "deserved" under the Actions Have Consequences Edict. They will whine to their grave that "Everybody Does It" - "They are All Jealous of Us" - and "A Dan Kane N&O Witch Hunt". Pick one, two or all three excuses.


fayettewuf

I like the idea of referring to whats-his-name that way, if he must be referred to at all. Maybe WHN?
Wow, Carol has to be thinking of another line of work. Her previous employer is under fire. SACS has decided to pile on at unc with the accreditation re-evaluation letter. Bet assistant dean of students at a quiet community college in Montana looks pretty good to her right now.
_______________


BL:

Yep! She sure done "stepped in it" now.
.

Remember: As "fans" they are under NO obligation to ever face Reality. None whatsoever.


JD

On a scale of "nothing to see here" to "death penalty for every sport" where are we right now with NCAA?
____________


BL:

This is all "uncharted Waters" for the NCAA. Such a comprehensive investigative report handed to them is unheard of. The "crimes" are also new.

I doubt there will be any decision until Spring at the earliest.

"a delayed decision" does NOT help unc's FB or BBall futures at all. They can't recruit with that sword over their head.



WolfPack00

Now that TGU at Dartmouth has come to light, your friends at IC can say "See everybody does it" again!
______________


BL:

What "you people" don't get about the IC crowd is they will still be Holocaust-Deniers regardless of any NCAA sanctions.

That carolina Way wine IS their blood. That faux pompous arrogance can NEVER be legislated out of them. Their obnoxiousness will never go away.


Lee Allen

So, what's your best guess as to how TGU ends, and on what time-line? Specifically, what happens to ORW, Bubba, the Provost, Folt, the Hat, Judge Roy Bean Ross, Sylvia Hatchell, Handsome Anson and Mike Fox?
___________


BL:

I don't know any more than anyone else. I AM probably more objective than 95% of the speculators however.

I can forsee forfeiting the 2005 BBall title and a post-season ban for 1-2 years for both FB and BB and possibility some recruiting sanctions. And a multi-million $$$ fine.

Any/all of those could cause Roy to walk off on his own. I don't see him being "Fired" UNLESS it can be PROVEN that he knew what was going on.

Fedora could get so frustrated with admission/recruiting sanctions that he leaves on his own. I don't see any direct personal repercussions for the other coaches.

WHATEVER the severity of the sanctions, the ABC Mob will piss and moan and cry FOUL for 20-25 years minimum. Thats a given.


sal

I'll do you one better, BL. I'll state that the commentary by Mssrs. Merletti & Yates demonstrates the canyonesque schism that exists between the stereotypical "preppy rich white kids" and the AA contingent on both the team itself as well as the student body at large.

It's obvious - to me, at least - that the Merlettis in the University not only don't understand the differences between the way that they were brought up and the associated benefits thereof and the difficulty and unpreparedness of guys like Powell and others. It represents to me a pathetic lack of empathy, some socioeconomic bigotry, and in fact makes the entire situation that much worse. I mean, who do you suppose is better representative of the average uncch student? Matt "My dad sent me to a top-10 Private School" Merletti or Tydreke "I had a pot to piss in, but no window to throw it out of know'm saying" Powell?

And in saying that, how easy would it be to make the logical leap that the way Merletti, Yates et al view the Powells among them is IDENTICAL to the way the average uncch student views these kids? The Plantation analogy used by others seems to fit pretty well as far as I see it.
______________


BL:

Very well said. I absolutely concur on all points.



M_N

I don't know why seemingly smart adults like Matt and Bryn can't grasp that if you can do the work, there is no need to put you in the "paper class" system. It is not stunning to me they had a completely different experience from Tydreke and to basically call him a liar is really doing their message a good deal of harm.

"Matts & Bryns don’t even need Mary or whatshisname that hates Mary so much. "

That made coffee shoot out my nose and you owe me a keyboard. But speaking of that, have you yet been told why a Tier 1 research institute like unc needs "reading specialists"?
_________________


BL:

I don't believe those "reading specialists" show up on the official faculty roster. They are on a separate list, dontchuknow!

I'm sure Matt & Bryn "meant well" and their message played to a certain audience. Alas, that audience was NOT the general public or anyone not knee-walking drunk on TCW wine.

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DevilDJ
post Nov 14 2014, 10:59 AM
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Forgot to highlight this from the Bob Lee article...
QUOTE
IF unc COULD field an ACC-competitive FB team of all Matt & Bryns (and Dannys), they would. Matt & Bryn are very Low Maintenance. The Tydrekes and Marvins and Rashads and Greg Littles; well, they’re NOT so Low Maintenance. But they are very very good football players. Matts & Bryns don’t even need Mary or whatshisname that hates Mary so much.

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DevilDJ
post Nov 15 2014, 01:52 PM
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In a blatant CYA move , unx uses FERPA to shield academicians involved. unx readily made known the identities of those fball players...BLACK fball players at that...

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DevilDJ
post Nov 15 2014, 08:56 PM
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Strohm headed to UL. Their prez? Dr. James R. Ramsey....
QUOTE
He has served as vice chancellor for finance and administration at both the University of North carolina at Chapel Hill and Western Kentucky University...He has served on the faculties of unc – Chapel Hill, WKU, UK, Loyola and Middle Tennessee State University.

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DevilDJ
post Nov 15 2014, 09:28 PM
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McAdoo case asks: What are student-athletes owed?

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Michael McAdoo lost his NCAA eligibility to play football for the University of North carolina at Chapel Hill after a student honor court found him guilty of receiving impermissible help from a tutor who footnoted and sourced one of his papers.

When McAdoo unsuccessfully sued to be reinstated in 2011, he included a copy of the disputed paper, which turned out to have been heavily lifted from material on the Internet. That led to questions about why the professor involved, Julius Nyang’oro, hadn’t detected the paper’s flaws and opened the university’s scandal involving the Department of African and Afro-American Studies and no-show classes for athletes.

But what began with unacknowledged use of others’ writing is turning into an entirely original legal chapter. McAdoo, a defensive end out of Antioch, Tenn., who played during unc’s 2008 and 2009 seasons, has sued the university for breach of contract claiming he was denied the education promised him by then-head unc football coach Butch Davis.

McAdoo filed the suit in federal court and asked that it be accepted as a class action including himself and all football players on scholarship between 1993 and 2011. That is the period that a report from Kenneth Wainstein, a former Justice Department official, says the more than 3,000 students, nearly half of them athletes, were steered into a “shadow curriculum” of bogus classes.

The contract at issue is the promise Davis made to McAdoo, his mother and his grandparents when he came to McAdoo’s home to recruit him. “I can’t guarantee that Michael will play in the NFL,” Davis allegedly said, “But one thing I can guarantee is that he will get a good education at the University of North carolina.”

It’s unlikely McAdoo’s suit will be granted class action status – it doesn’t help that it starts with only one plaintiff – and even if he pursues it alone, it will be on tenuous legal ground. One obvious problem will be proving that he didn’t consent to the fraudulent classes and was exploiting the school as much as it was of him.

McAdoo, who played football in Canada and is trying to break into the NFL, lives in Maryland. He was not available for comment.

Prospects for its success aside, the McAdoo lawsuit is a significant development in unc’s academic-athletic scandal and in the debate about college revenue sports. Should it go forward, the discovery process and testimony under oath could bring more harsh light on how unc routed athletes into sham courses. It also brings into sharp focus this question: Just what is the exchange athletes make when they give their time and talents to a major football or basketball program? The schools and coaches collect millions of dollars. What do the athletes get? Apparently it’s not always an education. If that’s not provided, what are they owed?

Jeremi Duru, an American University law professor and one of McAdoo’s attorneys, says compensation is not the aim of the suit, reform is. The suit asks that all athletes be given four-year scholarhips, not the current renewable one-year scholarships. And it wants the curriculum for football athletes to be reviewed by a court-appointee who would confirm that the courses are legitimate for five years.

“We want to ensure that unc remains committed to the student-athlete principle …. We’ve seen a departure from that. We would love to see that restored,” Duru says. “McAdoo came forward because he wants to right a wrong.”

Bob Orr, a Raleigh attorney who is a former member of the N.C. Court of Appeals and former justice on the N.C. Supreme Court, informally advised McAdoo when he was seeking reinstatement of his NCAA eligibility. He is not involved in the current lawsuit, but he said it is focused on a central problem for top sports programs at schools with quality academics.

“You can’t bring somebody in with a skill set below the median at unc, Duke or Notre Dame and work them 40 hours a week and expect them to get up to speed doing normal college-level work,” Orr says. He expects that McAdoo’s case is the first of a series that will focus on this conflict between obtaining performance and providing an education.

“I think the McAdoo case is the tip of the iceberg,” he says. “I think there will be other litigation, more expansive litigation.”

Paul Haagen, a professor of sports law and policy at Duke Law School, says the lawsuit is unlikely to succeed, but it could have value nonetheless. “This one sounds like it’s got some real problems,” he says, “but independent of the ability to get damages, this is another opportunity to get discovery and highlight an issue that is going to expose the divide between running an educational institution and running an entertainment wing of a university.”

Haagen says the case “may go nowhere,” but if it advances at all it will get at the key question that is emerging about college revenue sports: “What inexactly is the value being exchanged for the risk and time of what these kids are engaged in, especially when some people are benefiting extraordinarily?”

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DevilDJ
post Nov 16 2014, 12:37 PM
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QUOTE
Fat Cats Rearranging Deck Chairs

QUOTE
“BobLee’s 60-Second Sound-Off” is a new segment on this season’s Good Sports’ pre-game show. I offer up an incredibly insightful “can he say THAT on the radio?” rant about something hopefully related somehow to unc Football.

A trick in effective “provocative radio” is not to warn ones on-air partners (or station “suits”) what one is about to say. This results in their fresh on-air response plus allows “the suits” to have plausible deniability when offended listeners storm the station with pitchforks and torches.

Yesterday BobLee unloaded on unc “Fat Cats” who amidst The Great Unpleasantness are occupying themselves by Rearranging the deck chairs on The Titanic. It has been suggested that I share my aired comments with you my valued cyber-audience.

BobLee’s 60-Second Shout-Out.... WCHL’s Good Sports 11/15/14:

I’m going to assume that everyone listening to us this morning is aware that the University of North carolina is operating under a cloud of considerable duress.

The most distressing duress that has ever enveloped this university, its athletics department, the community of Chapel Hill, and the hearts and minds of almost every alumnus and fan of carolina.

I say ALMOST. Apparently one particular group of alumni/fans – those so-called “Fat Cats” have decided to concern itself with what might best be called – Rearranging the deck chairs on The Titanic.


That phrase refers to a reality-avoidance technique whereby one concerns oneself with a totally insignificant issue in the midst of a REALLY REALLY BFD CRISIS. Nero's "fiddling while Rome burns" is similar.

I recently received a copy of an Email sent a week or so ago to unc Athletics Director Bubba Cunningham. The FROM/CC of said Email contained the names of dozens of prominent so-called Fat Cats – gentlemen of considerable influence and prominence within the carolina / Chapel Hill community. Gentlemen who will be watching today’s game from the plush environs of Upper Level Blue Zone suites and “Pope Boxes”.

I was NOT included in the e-distribution itself. My copy was courtesy of someone who was. If I read off their names you would recognize names of some current and former unc Trustees, unc Board of Governors and long time influential members of the Rams Club. Yes, of course, a member of the Notorious BOT3 was included.

These deep-pocketed Tar Heel partisans - titans of industry and commerce one and all - felt compelled to formally notify Bubba The Real AD that they are quite concerned about one particular issue.

The Issue That Warranted Their Concern is NOT The Crowder Nyang’oro Scheme nor any of the related issues brought to light by The Martin Report, The Wainstein Report, or any issue ever mentioned in any article ever written by Dan Kane. Nope. None of those silly trivialities are first and foremost in the minds of these unc Fats Cats. Noooo.....

They, rather, are concerned about the non-traditional color combinations of Tar Heel Football UNIFORMS. Let me use my best Allan Iverson “Practice” voice. These Aged Frat Boys In Eternal Pursuit of Braggin’ Rights are worried about UNIFORMS ..... UNIFORMS.


Amid this Historic Tumult in which this University community is dog-paddling to stay afloat, these privileged powerbrokers are insisting that Bubba Cunningham and Larry Fedora reorder their current priorities. Bubba and Larry are, they contend, “inflicting irreparable damage to the brand of Tar Heel Football" by tinkering with Kenan fashion tradition.

Try reading that last sentence without giggling.... or saying “Oh My!”


I readily acknowledge that the long-term fiscal generosity of these gentlemen to their alma mater DOES grant them the right to express their opinion. Regardless of how ill-timely ridiculous that expression may be.

If Marvin Austin had never tweeted four years ago. If all the subsequent dominos had not collapsed to where This Vain Glorious Proud University is now a National Punchline and likely facing significant punitive actions for its assorted sins of omission and commissions. The color of our Football uniforms MIGHT indeed be an interesting tailgate discussion.

Under ideal circumstances it WOULD be a fascinatingly lively discussion while holding a Bloody Mary in one hand and a country ham biscuit in the other. I am the quintessential old-school traditionalist who much prefers carolina Blue as our primary uniform color.

“Uniforms” would be a key chapter in the book I oughta write: The Spectators VS The Gladiators: The Real Game In Big Time College Athletics.

But Marvin Austin DID tweet and and and here we are today November 2014 - Here & Now.

NOW is NOT the time to be hot & bothered about freakin’ UNIFORMS. But wait a minute.

Maybe Such Misdirected Priorities is how we got into this Gloriously Unpleasant Mess to begin with. Ya think?

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DevilDJ
post Nov 17 2014, 05:28 PM
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QUOTE
A sports education

QUOTE
College athletics has a glaring problem: In a $16 billion industry, everyone gets paid ­except the players.

Traditionally, the quid pro quo has been this: In exchange for playing for their schools — of which make a fortune from their players — athletes would be given, free, a college ­degree.

But when those degrees become cheapened, the bargain is off and litigation begins.

Let’s start with the ongoing scandal that is the University of North carolina. unc has been in the headlines of late because of charges it was letting its “student athletes” get credits they really hadn’t earned.

First the university resisted the charges — publicly questioning the integrity of the accusers.

Now Chapel Hill has admitted that for 18 years, more than 3,100 students took what were essentially phony classes, and half of those who took them were student athletes.

It is a shocking disservice, because while it may help the basketball program, it leaves the players who effectively worked for the school without the real college degree they had been promised.


That’s the gist of a class-action lawsuit filed by former unc linebacker Michael McAdoo. McAdoo argues that he and fellow former unc athletes were promised a quality education by coaches, only to be steered “into a ‘shadow curriculum’ of bogus courses which never met and which were designed for the sole purpose of providing enrollees high grades.”

It’s going to be hard for unc to argue with that.


Or look at former South carolina running back Marcus Lattimore. After two devastating injuries during his junior year, Lattimore was faced with two choices:

He could give the NFL a shot and hope to be drafted and signed, or he could return to South carolina, risking another injury, which would end any chance for the $2.45 million contract the San Francisco 49ers offered.

Not surprisingly, he chose to go pro. Two years later, he’s just announced he’s retiring from football and intends to go back to carolina to finish his degree. The catch is he will have to pay for it himself.

Probably this won’t be a hardship for Lattimore. But too many athletes do not realize they will not make the pros until after they have used up their scholarships, leaving them with the worst of all worlds: no pro career and no college degree.

Colleges have many choices: Expand student eligibility, allowing students to finish their degrees after their sports eligibility has run out. Or pay student-athletes. Or pay college coaches a couple million less.

Or honor the original deal: sports in exchange for a real degree.

National? Not national?
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DevilDJ
post Nov 17 2014, 06:18 PM
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QUOTE
Harvard, unc Sued Over Race-Based Admissions

QUOTE
Administrators of Harvard University and the University of North carolina at Chapel Hill were sued by an advocacy group claiming race-based admissions policies violate the constitutional rights of highly qualified Asian applicants.

Students for Fair Admissions Inc., a group which said it represents unidentified college applicants rejected by both schools, alleged in lawsuits filed today that the use of racial preferences illegally limited admission of Asian Americans.

Such applicants “understand that they are not competing” against “the entire applicant pool,” the group said in its filing against Harvard’s governing body, the Harvard Corp., in Boston federal court. “They are competing only against each other, and all other racial and ethnic groups are insulated from competing against high-achieving Asian Americans.”

Administrators for the University of North carolina have also used admissions policies aimed at achieving diversity that had a detrimental effect on Asian American applicants, the group alleged in a separate suit in Greensboro federal court.

The group claimed use of race in admissions allows universities including Harvard and unc to show preferences for particular groups, failing to meet standards set under a U.S. Supreme Court decision last year requiring schools “implement race-neutral means to achieve student body and diversity before turning to racial classifications and preferences.”

Citing an earlier high court decision upholding affirmative action, Robert Iuliano, Harvard’s general counsel, said today that the university’s admissions policies “remain fully compliant with all legal requirements and are essential to the pedagogical objectives that underlie Harvard's educational mission.”

Rick White, associate vice chancellor for communications at unc, said in a separate statement that the university “stands by its current undergraduate admissions policy and process.”

QUOTE
Advocacy Groups

The Austin, Texas-based group that announced the lawsuit did so in tandem with the Project on Fair Representation, an Alexandria, Virginia-based organization that advocates against race or ethnicity-based policies in state and federal courts. On its website, that group said it’s associated with Project Liberty Inc., a nonprofit which said on its web-page that its mission is “limited government, personal enterprise and free enterprise.”

Project on Fair Representation was behind the lawsuit leading to last year’s high court ruling on race-based admissions. The plaintiffs in today’s cases seek court orders barring the universities from using race as a factor in undergraduate admissions, arguing that using other criteria, such as socioeconomic status, could better ensure diversity.

The plaintiff allegations involving Harvard are more severe, alleging that despite the high court ruling, the university maintains a quota-like system, likening it to attempts to limit the number of Jewish students in the 1920s.

The cases are Students For Fair Admissions Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College et al, 1:14-cv-14176, U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts (Boston); and Students For Fair Admissions Inc. v. University of North carolina et al., 1:14-cv-00954, U.S. District Court, Middle District of North carolina (Greensboro).

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QUOTE
PROJECT ON FAIR REPRESENTATION ANNOuncES LAWSUITS CHALLENGING ADMISSIONS POLICIES AT HARVARD UNIV. AND UNIV. OF NORTH carolina-CHAPEL HILL

QUOTE
(Washington, DC) Today, the Project on Fair Representation announces the filing of two lawsuits challenging the racial preference admissions policies of Harvard and the University of North carolina-Chapel Hill.

The plaintiff in both lawsuits—Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA)— is a newly-formed, nonprofit, membership organization whose members include highly qualified students recently denied admission to both schools, highly qualified students who plan to apply to both schools, and their parents.

The Harvard lawsuit alleges the university is engaging in a campaign of invidious discrimination by strictly limiting the number of Asian Americans it will admit each year and by engaging in racial balancing year after year. These discriminatory policies in college admissions are expressly forbidden by the Fourteenth Amendment and federal civil rights laws.

Students for Fair Admission’s complaint highlights data and analysis that strongly suggests that white, African-American, and Hispanic applicants are given racial preferences over better qualified Asian-Americans applying for admission to Harvard.

Additionally, the complaint demonstrates that Harvard is not in compliance with the new “strict scrutiny” standards articulated in 2013 by the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. The Fisher opinion unambiguously requires schools to implement race-neutral means to achieve student body diversity before turning to racial classifications and preferences.

The unc-Chapel Hill lawsuit alleges that, like Harvard, the University is not in compliance with the new Fisher strict scrutiny requirements. Students for Fair Admissions explains in its complaint that unc has admitted in an amicus brief it submitted to the Supreme Court in the Fisher case that the school can maintain, and actually increase, racial diversity through race-neutral means if it ends its race-based affirmative action policies. Students for Fair Admissions argues that this compels the university to end its racial classifications and preferences and adopt some combination of race-neutral policies instead.

The discrimination against Asian-Americans at Harvard and both schools’ blatant failure to comply with recent Supreme Court directives with regard to race preferences are emblematic of the behavior of the vast majority of competitive colleges throughout the country. Because of this, Students for Fair Admissions asserts in its complaints that racial classifications and preferences in college admissions are inadministratable; a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment and federal civil rights laws; and must be ended as a matter of policy and law.

Edward Blum, the director of the Project on Fair Representation, said, “These two lawsuits are the first of what are expected to be several similar challenges to other competitive colleges that continue to unconstitutionally use racial preferences in admission decisions. Students for Fair Admissions encourages any student who was recently rejected from a competitive university to contact us at www.StudentsForFairAdmission.org.”

The Harvard complaint documents the school’s long, irrefutable, history of instituting admissions policies to limit the number of Jewish students beginning in the 1920’s. The “Harvard Plan” itself—and the concept of an admissions system based on a “holistic” review of applicants instead of admission based on academic accomplishment—was formulated for the specific purpose of discriminating against Jews. Harvard’s “holistic review” today is primarily a similar tool to limit the number of Asian Americans it admits each year.

Blum continued, “It is especially disconcerting that public data shows that Harvard has purposefully limited the percentage of Asian-American freshman it admits. In fact, the number of Asian-Americans Harvard admits today is lower than it was 20-years ago, even though the number of highly qualified Asian-American applicants to Harvard has nearly doubled. Harvard’s discrimination against Asian-Americans is as deeply troubling today as was the discrimination against Jewish applicants that Harvard perpetrated in the name of ‘holistic’ admissions years ago.”

Blum concluded, “The University of North carolina at Chapel Hill has no need to continue to use racial and ethnic preferences and should end them now instead of facing years of expensive and polarizing litigation.”

Counsel for SFFA are Mr. William Consovoy and Mr. Thomas McCarthy of Consovoy McCarthy PLLC based in Arlington, Virginia.

The Project on Fair Representation (POFR) is a not-for-profit legal defense fund program that is designed to support litigation that challenges racial and ethnic classifications and preferences in state and federal courts. POFR provided counsel in a number of recent Supreme Court cases including, Northwest Austin Municipal Utility District No. One v. Holder; Abigail Fisher v. Univ. of Texas at Austin; and Shelby Co., Alabama v. Holder.

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post Nov 18 2014, 12:00 AM
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SG

This whole mess really is no where near over is it?
_____________


BL:

No, not in my opinion. I think the worst is yet to come and I don't mean just the NCAA sanctions.

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Wolfdon

C'mon now, JB = Jan Boxill. Have you read the recent issue of the DTH? It seems to be following the Twins' tradition of objectivity in reporting regardless of where the chips may fall.
I realize they have moved on.....
_______________


BL:

We're getting way too many co-conspirators involved in this mess... or else we need more letters in the alphabet. I'm not yet wired to think "JB = Jan Boxhill".

Nicole asked me if "that JB" was still on the unc payroll. No one seems to know. Those who do know, ain't "being transparent". SURPRISE!

Everyone I know thinks diving into Jan's dumpster could yield a LOT of new names and grades. She (Jan) might even lose Sylvia's love and admiration before its all over.

Word is all of JB's co-workers knew she was running a flim flam for years but were "reluctant" to speak out. "Whistle-blowing at unc" is not for the faint-hearted as we've learned.

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Wolfdon

did the Comparato twins have any comment regarding the DTH article re : JB's dalliance into independent studies for student athletes ala the philosophy department ?
______________


BL:

If JB refers to John Bunting??? They were high school students in Boca Raton during that era. So no. Nor do they have opinions on whether or not Claude Sitton and Dean Smith caused Jimmy V's cancer.

The current DTH leadership is dealing with The Mess from a different angle than it did under Nicole's Reign. Not more or less critically / objectively, just differently.

FWIW... Despite her earnest promise to "be transparent", Charming Little Carol continually refused to meet with Nicole when she was DTH Editor.
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post Nov 19 2014, 09:56 PM
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Miller: Discussing possible sanctions for unc in academic fraud scandal

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Now that the Weinstein Report has revealed the true scope of the academic fraud perpetrated by the AFAM department, the athletic department and other university officials at unc, what level and type of punishment should the Tar Heels’ scandal incur? The NCAA has the opportunity to reaffirm the academic primacy of its mission; how will they respond to the findings in the Wainstein Report and the results of their own investigation into the matter?

When considering any possible penalties, it is important to remember how the “paper class” scheme was devised and maintained, and who knew what and when. The Weinstein Report is very clear where and how the fraud originated: The idea was hatched by AFAM department secretary Debbie Crowder, who had an illegal, albeit noble, desire to help academically disadvantaged students, especially athletes, in any way she could.

Crowder’s efforts were aided and abetted by department chair Julius Nyang’oro, who, despite his occasional moral qualms concerning his and his department’s actions, either perpetuated the scheme or allowed individuals like Crowder free rein to change grades, forge signatures and ignore the quality of assignments in the course of the grading process.

The key takeaway here is that no athletic department personnel – whether administrators, coaches, advisors or tutors – went to Crowder, Nyang’oro or anyone else in the AFAM department to suggest the initiation of academic fraud. To be sure, these individuals knew about and appreciated the existence of the scheme and, when Crowder was set to retire, lobbied hard for its continuance, but never was it their intention to commit academic fraud at the outset. Athletic department personnel were simply taking advantage of a situation they knew could be to their short-term benefit.

Because of these circumstances, I believe it would be inappropriate to give unc the so-called “death penalty” – banning the football, basketball and other athletic teams from competition for a period of time. Even though the academic fraud seen at Chapel Hill is truly unprecedented, the fact that the athletic department wasn’t at the heart of the improprieties leads me to believe that competition bans should not be imposed (despite the fact that some current Tar Heel athletes may have been, at one point, beneficiaries of the “paper classes”).

It seems to me that more appropriate consequences from the NCAA should include, at the very least, vacating wins from the programs whose players remained academically eligible because of the “paper classes.” Penalties of this variety would likely blot out unc’s national championships in men’s basketball in 2005 and 2009, forever tarnishing legendary coach Roy Williams’ legacy at Chapel Hill.

Speaking of Williams, I believe he should remain personally unscathed in this situation, insofar as I don’t believe it’s a collegiate coach’s responsibility to regulate or vet the classes his/her players are taking. Roy is a very prideful man, and the loss of past championships would more than rock his boat, especially when considering that he’s still incredulous that his players were even involved in the fiasco.

In addition to vacating wins, I believe the NCAA should impose a two-season postseason ban on the men’s basketball and football teams (and any other programs found to have significantly benefited from the AFAM department’s academic fraud), as well as reduction in available scholarships for a period not to exceed two years.

Furthermore, the entire athletic department should be placed on NCAA-administered probation for the period of time equal to the length of time the “paper class” scheme was in place, namely somewhere in the vicinity of 15-20 years. Under the terms of this probation, the unc athletic department should be ordered to compile comprehensive academic information on all of its athletes and allow an independent auditor to compare this information with university-wide academic data to ensure no major discrepancies continue to exist. Finally, the NCAA should levy the maximum allowable monetary fines against unc; these consequences have to hurt in order to deter similar behavior in the future.

As much as I’m against penalizing the student-athletes of today for the past transgressions of student-athletes and athletic personnel, the unc athletic department cannot go unpunished for allowing its athletes to take advantage of an academic fraud scheme of unparalleled proportions.

Parting shot... laugh.gif
QUOTE
The Weinstein report, which was authorized and paid for by unc, clearly constitutes an independent investigation, and could not have been possibly designed to reduce or minimize the involvement of important coaches and certain university officials in this scandal. To discuss the academic fraud scandal and Cameron’s self-proscribed authority over the issue, or how proud coach Williams must be over this possible CYA national championship, e-mail Cameron at cmiller6 ‘at’ stanford.edu.

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I wonder what sanctions he'd suggest if he actually understood how , why and WHO started the scam? He's wrong , obviously , when assigning blame and cause. His sanctions? Decent as STARTERS but nowhere near comprehensive and/or punitive enough.
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post Nov 20 2014, 08:46 PM
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Is criminal investigation next step at unc?

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North carolina's academic fraud investigations have yet to spark a probe from the NCAA. But one state senator would like to see them start a criminal investigation.

Republican state senator Thom Goolsby wrote on Tuesday that the university's continued academic integrity issues merit a tougher approach.

"The reputation of the state's flagship university is at stake and someone must take this matter seriously," Goolsby wrote on his blog, carolina Columns. "Any prosecutor worth his salt would turn detectives loose on staff and administrators involved in the fraud and subsequent cover-up. If necessary, the General Assembly could consider legislation to make prosecuting this type of academic fraud easier."

The university has been mired in athletic and academic-related scandals for two years. Among those has been the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes (ASPSA), which was subject of an internal review a year ago.

On Saturday, The News & Observer in Raleigh published a story detailing a system that tolerated cheating. Mary Willingham, a reading specialist at unc, detailed encounters with athletes who had never read a book or were incapable of writing a paragraph.

The academic support program tolerated plagiarism and helped athletes remain eligible, Willingham told the paper.

"The unc academic fraud scandal is like a pesky staph infection that just won't go away for university officials — nor should it," Goolsby wrote. "As reporters at the Raleigh News and Observer continue to dig, they uncover more and more dirty little secrets. The latest problems swirl around a pus pocket called the Academic Support Program."

Willingham's assertions are backed up by several investigations. An internal review at the school found 54 aberrant classes in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies (AFAM), largely populated by football and men's basketball players, received little or no instruction.

A committee of three faculty members reviewed three of unc's investigations and suggested that ASPSA steered athletes to no-show classes to keep them eligible.

According to the News & Observer, those no-show classes had been offered as far back as 2003 when Willingham joined the program. The paper's reporting has suggested that those classes go back as far as the late 1990s.

Four ongoing investigations have come as a result of the academic fraud, including one by former Gov. Jim Martin into is looking into when the academic fraud started and if it occurred in other departments.

For Goolsby, who received his law degree from the school and is a professor and practicing attorney, the situation bears more questions that administrators thus far have been unwilling to answer.

Outgoing chancellor Holden Thorp declined comment to the News & Observer in response to Willingham's assertions other than to say he is focused on Martin's investigation.

"The unc Board of Governors should seriously consider asking for the resignations of current unc Trustees who failed to safeguard academic integrity," wrote Goolsby. "They have shown little willingness to get to the truth of this scandal and cure the infection. When unc comes to the General Assembly for more funding, university officials should expect that legislators charged with representing the taxpayers will demand answers."

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post Yesterday, 12:34 AM
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Infamous? IN-famous? laugh.gif
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Seventy-two years later, what Hutchins called the “infernal nuisance” of college football is troubling more university administrators than ever. Ohio State, Miami, Southern California, North carolina and on and on: it is as if global warming were affecting the number of big-name colleges in hot water.

National? Not national?
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post Yesterday, 02:23 AM
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Should unc take a knee on this bowl season?

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North carolina pounded Duke on Thursday night, a reward in itself, and qualified for a bowl game. There was also the added bonus of knocking Duke out of the ACC title game.

As the Tar Heels celebrated with the Victory Bell and their jubilant fans in Durham, the last thing on anyone’s mind was Kenneth Wainstein or his report.

But now that the Tar Heels have a chance to collect their thoughts, it’s at least worth considering the consequences of Wainstein’s report, which outlined an academic scandal unprecedented in its scope and length, and think about self-imposing a bowl ban this season.

The NCAA had reopened its investigation to the systematic academic fraud in the African and Afro-American studies department before Wainstein published his report in October.

QUOTE
NCAA inconsistency

The NCAA, with its slipshod enforcement and inconsistent record of consistent incompetence, is like a snowflake-covered box of chocolates – no two rulings are the same, and you never know what you’re gonna get.

But the unc administration finds itself at a crossroads, similar to the one it had in 2011. With the NCAA deliberating over a multi-pronged investigation into impermissible benefits to star players and an assistant coach who worked for an agent, the previous administration chose to send a 7-5 team to the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La.

The outcome, a 41-24 loss to Missouri, which qualified as a soup-to-nuts disaster, paled in comparison to the future cost. The NCAA wound up banning the Tar Heels from the 2012 postseason.

Instead of punting on Shreveport in ’11 with a self-imposed ban, Larry Fedora’s incredibly talented first team in ’12, with generational talents in running back Gio Bernard and tight end Eric Ebron, had to pay the price.

The Heels went 5-3 in the ACC and won the Coastal Division in 2012 but couldn’t play in the ACC championship game.

“That’s one of the things I can’t get over,” said Bryn Renner, the team’s quarterback in 2011 and ’12. “To be honest, I would have loved to have played in the ACC title game and skipped Shreveport.”

But that’s hindsight, Renner said; there’s no way you could have convinced him at the time that the program should have taken a knee and sat out the bowl game.

QUOTE
Different circumstances

The circumstances are different this season, Renner pointed out. In 2011, then interim-coach Everett Withers was on his way out. Now, Fedora is entrenched in his third season. There was also a complete changeover with the administration with a new chancellor and athletic director.

Renner said, even knowing his regrets from 2011, he’d want this team to go to a bowl game.

“The best thing for this team is to go 8-5 and let next season take care of itself,” Renner said.

Maybe Renner’s right, but the past two independent reports at major Division I programs – Wainstein’s at Miami in 2013 and Louis Freeh’s at Penn State – ostensibly led to a two-year bowl ban in each case.

In 2011 and 2012, Miami self-imposed a bowl ban. When the NCAA finally ruled on what amounted to a pay-for-play scam by booster Nevin Shapiro in 2013, the Hurricanes got credit for time served and did not get an additional postseason ban.

Penn State was given a four-year bowl ban by NCAA president Mark Emmert in 2012 for the sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. In October, that postseason ban was reduced to two years.

unc’s case is clearly different from Penn State’s or Miami’s, but it would not be unreasonable to predict that the NCAA could make the Tar Heels sit out at least one bowl game.

Like everything else at unc since the “Summer of Marvin and Greg,” it’s complicated.

On one hand, unc has the potential to finish the season with back-to-back wins over Duke and N.C. State. No trip to Charlotte, New York, Annapolis, Detroit or (gasp!) Shreveport is going to top that.

And with quarterback Marquise Williams back for his senior season in 2015, and the emergence of running back T.J. Logan, there’s a real chance for the Tar Heels to finally fulfill their potential.

On the other hand, there are no guarantees with the NCAA. The Tar Heels could punt and still not help their future cause.

It’s a tough choice, either way, but it’s a decision that’s looming.

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post Today, 02:36 AM
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Guy's pretty clued in. A smiley face indicates some good shet on the way...
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Posted: Yesterday 11:27 PM

Re: uncch scandal >$3mm to Wainstein/SACS letter details /

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